The Paneer Parantha

Best paneer is not from the market, it is from the kitchen. Prepare by curdling the boiling milk (with vinegar). Draining the liquid, squeezing through a thin cloth and pressing with some weight.

If you do not know the process, experiment a little. You can not go wrong, no-one till date has gone wrong.

Now you have paneer, think about all the other stuff you like, ajwain (carom, Bishop’s weed), salt, red chillies, onion. Add them to the crumbled paneer. Use this stuff as a filling. May use cilantro for visuals and aroma. Up-to you. Green chilly, same remark applies.

Whole wheat dough, take a ball, and use the filling. Lift the sides and cover itself. Roll a nice flat circular chapati out of this.IMG_20150924_170412 IMG_20150924_173557 IMG_20150924_173606 IMG_20150924_173619

Place this on the hot griddle, bake one side, flip over, bake on the other side. NOW….only now paste a little oil on this side. Flip over, repeat the oil application. Keep a spatula to press the parantha (after oil application, chapati becomes parantha).

If pressed properly, on the right places, and the gods in heaven benign, it may even puff up. Even if it does not, it is delicious to look at and heavenly to eat.

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Indian Bread Again

Roti….chapaati 101,

The basics

Presumably, the dough making is not a rocket science, but rolling chapati and cooking first on a griddle and then on a flame is/maybe. Hence photographs. Some cooks add flours of other grains in wheat flour. Some cooks prefer a stiffer dough, my preference is for a softer dough, which gives softness to the bread. Some cooks insist that the dough should rest a while, at least 30 minutes, I prefer it not to rest at all, and love the dough that way. Again North Indians prefer to have coarse flour.

My rolling pin has ball bearings and makes it easy, and fun thing to roll. I do not wash it, only scrub with the back of a knife for any sticking dry dough. Always wash my hands CLEAN before touching flour or dough. No rings in the finger is a good policy. Alternately I do not touch flour or dough by hand. Use a spoon. Even for making small balls, I use a spoon, take a small portion and start rolling, untouched by hand till then.

Feel motivated to try your hand? GA (go ahead, old telex lingo)

Dough ready to be rolled
Dough ready to be rolled
Rolling Zero
Rolling Zero
Rolling 2
Rolling 2
Rolling1
Rolling1
Removing from Marble plate to the griddle
Removing from Marble plate to the griddle
On the HOT Griddle
On the HOT Griddle
Ready to Flip
Ready to Flip
Flipped/Cooking on the other side
Flipped/Cooking on the other side
Cooking directly on the flame
Cooking directly on the flame
Cooking on the flame
Cooking on the flame

Without oil, another Indian Vegetable

Trichosanthes dioicaThe entry in Wikipedia is….Trichosanthes dioica is also known as the pointed gourd, parwal/parval (from Hindi),Kovakkai(from Tamil) or thonde kayi (from Kannada), or potol (from Assamese, Sanskrit, Oriya or Bengali (পটল) pôţol) “Paror” in Maithili, “Parol” in Magahi and “Parora” in Bhojpuri, Urdu and Awadhi.

It is called Parwal in Hindi.

In 1960s the rich Delhi-wallahs used to eat this vegetable because it was expensive, or the other way round 🙂 Today the poor eat it, also the quality available in my market is a little extra ripened having a yellow core and the seeds as hard as the teeth.

I thought of a little innovation, removed the core, boiled with some water and strained to remove the hard seeds. I used the liquor so obtained as the base for the vegetable. Because the core has taste and gives body and aroma, I did not discard it wholesale. Remember “Baby with the bath water?”

You are now to see the process in the photos below, the Parwal is peeled, ends discarded, and cut in halves.

Peeled Parwal
Peeled Parwal

With a spoon, the yellow inside core is removed and boiled. Then handheld blender does the blending to remove the stone-like seeds. Some were having white cores, I did not remove the cores and used as such.

White core
White core

After dicing the Parwals, Tomatoes and masala that is turmeric, coriander, green chillies, salt, ginger and cuminseeds were added alongwith the parwal in a pressure cooker, heated till first whistle and allowed to cool on its own.

Final act is to add Garam masala (curry powder). No oil….none at all, no tadka like we usually do, no tamaasha, all taste.

Minimal masala, low on spices high on health. At Rs 20 (third of a $) for a Kg, very inexpensive.

The photos show 1Kg preparation, good for 5 persons for one time.

When I ate it I realized that the dish can be improved in color, texture and taste. Next time there will be some crushed boiled potatoes to add body, and the tomatoes will be in a skinned avatar. Skins irritate. 🙂

Diced stuff
Diced stuff
Cored Parwal
Cored Parwal
yellow core
yellow core
Seeds discarded
Seeds discarded
Straining the liquor
Straining the liquor

IMG_20150516_093014IMG_20150516_092951IMG_20150516_092059

The Curry powder (Garam Masaala)
The Curry powder (Garam Masaala)

IMG_20150516_094927

Close-up
Close-up
Final product
Final product
With a Roti (chapati)
With a Roti (chapati)

Cauliflower Simplistic

I love Cauliflower as an edible flower, which looks good and has great aroma. This flower was 700 gms,​  (Indian Rupees 12 per Kg), very tender and soft.

So I added a few boiled potatoes, and sauteed onions​, garlic, green chillies​, turmeric, jeera​ and ginger, in the large​ Japanese​ non stick pan (10″ dia and 2 inch deep)​, a little water and kept it on to boiling covered with a large plate (thaali)​.


R​educed heat and kept it for a very short while say five minutes.

Added a little salt and lemon juice. Result was very edible and al dente.

Have a look.

​…again can’t send the aroma through the satellite!​
गोभी सीधा साधा
Cauliflower preparation